Policy tackles problem of just how much homework there should be

Email item Email item Print item Print item

Policy tackles problem of just how much homework there should beThe Ministry of Education and Employment has launched the first framework of a national homework policy for early years to end of secondary.

In a statement the Ministry said that, “this policy, which is based on local and international research and evidence, offers very clear guidance on the real value of homework taking into account the influences on teaching children and students.”

This framework is also addressing the impact that the “exaggerated amounts of homework” is having on our children, the Ministry said.

“Today we are addressing the exaggerated amount of homework that may be being given to children, the pressure and fight with the time it brings everyday, and the lack of time left for children so that they can play, rest and relax, socialise, as well as practice some form of sport or cultural activity,” the Minister for Education Evarist Bartolo said.

“This policy is not to remove the homework completely, but it should remain part of the educational experience that aims to give a balance between education and the individual’s needs,” he said.

The Minister added that, “I invite parents to encourage their children to consider joining any sport organisation or take part in cultural activities or volunteering. Less homework should not mean more TV or playing in front of a computer screen, but a more open life.” He also stressed how important reading is, both on their own and as a family.”

According to the Policy the Timing, scheduling, and quantity of homework should be:

Kindergarten: No homework should be assigned although kindergarten educators may provide and recommend resources to support families in early learning activities (playing, talking, and reading together). It is important to consider that parental involvement increases student achievement. Parents can be involved by reading with their children, and involving their children in sports and cultural activities.

Years 1-2: At this level reading to and/or with children on a daily basis in one’s mother tongue increases student achievement. The major focus of homework should be on reading and interactive activities including play. By end of year 2 the amount of homework should not exceed more than 20 minutes per day.

Years 3-6: By year 3, the amount of homework should not exceed more than 30 minutes per day. Independent homework should be introduced and should not exceed more than 45 minutes per day by grade 6. Gradual increment in the amount of homework is advisable.

Years 7-8: While homework in these years can contribute to an increase in student achievement, the total amount of homework should not exceed one hour per day. It is crucial that assigned homework is well planned and coordinated between teachers of different subjects.

Years 9-11: While homework in these years contributes to an increase in student achievement, the total amount of homework should not exceed 8 hours per week. It is crucial that assigned homework is well planned and coordinated between teachers of different subjects. It is also advisable that for student that move to year 9 homework demands should be increased gradually to minimise stress. kindergarten: years 1-2: years 3-6: years 7-8: years 9-11.

 

  • Permalink: Policy tackles problem of just how much homework there should be
  • You may also like...

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *