Malta has the third lowest electricity price in the EU – Eurostat

Email item Email item Print item Print item

Malta has the third lowest electricity price in the EU - EurostatIn the European Union (EU), household electricity prices rose by 2.9% on average between the second half of 2013 and the second half of 2014 to reach €20.8 per 100 kWh.

However, According to the Eurostat data just released, Malta had the third lowest electricity price in the European Union at €12.5 per 100kWh, behind Bulgaria and Hungary. It also had the most noticeable decrease in price at -26.2%.

The share of taxes and levies in the total household electricity price for Malta, was also the lowest in Europe at 5%, a figure shared with the UK.

Since 2008, electricity prices in the EU have increased by more than 30%. Across the EU Member States, household electricity prices in the second half of 2014 ranged from €9 per 100 kWh in Bulgaria to more than €30 per 100 kWh in Denmark.

Household gas prices increased by 2.0% on average in the EU between the second halves of 2013 and 2014 to hit €7.2 per 100 kWh. Since 2008, gas prices in the EU have risen by 35%. Among Member States, household gas prices in the second half of 2014 ranged from just over €3 per 100 kWh in Romania to above €11 per 100 kWh in Sweden.

Taxes and levies made up on average in the EU 32% of the electricity price charged to households in the second half of 2014, and 23% of the gas price.

When expressed in purchasing power standards (PPS), an artificial common reference currency that eliminates general price level differences between countries, it can be seen that, relative to the cost of other goods and services, the lowest household electricity prices were found in Finland (12.4 PPS per 100 kWh), Latvia (13.7) and Luxembourg (14.2), and the highest in Germany (28.2), Cyprus and Portugal (both 27.4) and Spain (26.0). Malta stood at 16.5%.

The share of taxes and levies in total household electricity prices varied significantly between Member States, ranging from more than 50% in Denmark (57% of household electricity price is made up of taxes and levies) and Germany (52%) to 5% in both Malta and the United Kingdom in the second half of 2014. On average in the EU, taxes and levies accounted for almost a third (32%) of household electricity prices.

Across the EU Member States, the highest increase in household electricity prices in national currency between the second half of 2013 and the second half of 2014 was registered by far in France (+10.2%), followed by Luxembourg (+5.6%), Ireland (+5.4%), Greece (+5.2%), Portugal (+4.7%), the United Kingdom (+4.6%) and Spain (+4.1%).

In contrast, the most noticeable decrease was observed in Malta (-26.2%), well ahead of the Czech Republic (-10.2%), Hungary (-9.9%), the Netherlands (-9.6%), Slovakia (-9.2%) and Belgium (-7.8%).

Expressed in euro, average household electricity prices in the second half of 2014 were lowest in Bulgaria (€9.0 per 100 kWh) and Hungary (€11.5) and highest in Denmark (€30.4) and Germany (€29.7). The average electricity price in the EU was €20.8 per 100 kWh.

These figures on energy prices in the EU are complemented with an article published by Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union.

  • Permalink: Malta has the third lowest electricity price in the EU – Eurostat
  • You may also like...

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *